Louisiana is a spooky place, let's be honest. If you've ever been on one of those ghost tours in the French Quarter, or taken a tour at the Myrtles Plantation in St Francisville, then you know what I mean.

Only in Louisiana has found some locations around the state that have bona fide paranormal activity. And we're not surprised at all. Check out some of the most famous destinations below, and let us know if you've been to any other paranormal hotspots that we need to check out.

  • The Myrtles Plantation - 7747 US Hwy 61, St. Francisville. Supposedly the most haunted house in America, and if you've ever taken the tour, you'll know why. (The vibe is pretty intense) Built in 1796, the 'resident ghost'  is known as Chloe, a former slave girl who was killed by the plantation owners.
  • The Old State Capitol -100 North Blvd., Baton Rouge. Built somewhere between 1847 - 1852, this imposing structure used to be a prison and a hospital during the Civil War.  Supposedly haunted by a little girl named Sara Morgan.
  • Shreveport Municipal Auditorium - 705 Elvis Presley Boulevard, Shreveport. Home of the historic Louisiana Hayride radio program and on the National Historic Register. It's been open since 1929
  • Le Pavillion - 833 Poydras St., New Orleans. This historic hotel allegedly is haunted by up to 100 ghosts, the most popular being a couple dressed in 1920's attire.
  • Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Site - Highway 154, Bienville Parish, near Gibsland. Just thinking about the horrific events surrounding the deaths of these two at this location gives me the creeps. You can also visit the museum dedicated to the two criminals at the Bonnie & Clyde Ambush Museum, at 2419 Main St
  • Hotel Bentley - 200 Desoto St., Alexandria. Sightings at the hotel, which was built in 1907, include a child who fell down an elevator shaft and died, and possibly even an appearance by Mr Bentley himself.
  • Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop - 941 Bourbon St., New Orleans. The oldest building used as a bar in America. Built in the 1700's, (and still standing!) Jean Lafitte himself is said to roam the grounds of this charming French Quarter building.