There are two active tropical weather features in the Atlantic Basin. One of those features is weakening. The other is forecast to get stronger. The good news is that neither system is supposed to create a major impact on any land mass in their respective paths.

Beryl, the season's first hurricane, has weakened into a remnant low pressure over the Lesser Antilles. Forecasters suggested last week that this would be the case as Beryl was moving into atmospheric conditions that were not favorable for tropical development. The greatest threat from Beryl will be heavy rains over areas of the globe that are still reeling after Hurricane Maria last year.

There is the potential that Beryl could move into more favorable conditions for development over the next couple of days. Currently, forecasters with the National Hurricane Center are giving the system a 30% probability of strengthening as it moves northward over the southern Bahamas.

Tropical Storm Chris is in close proximity of the U.S. coastline but forecasters believe the system will pose very little threat to the coastal communities of North and South Carolina. Chris is forecast to become a  hurricane by later today. It is then forecast to move northeastward toward the Canadian Maritime provinces. The system should weaken before it encounters any land mass to the north.

Elsewhere in the tropics conditions are calm and no additional development is forecast for the next five days.