With the threat of more rains ahead, Acadian Ambulance is readying extra ambulances for our area.

According to the company, Acadian Ambulance is moving ambulances from their facilities in Texas to Louisiana after we experienced torrential rains on Monday.

Forecasters are calling for more rain and thunderstorms this week, with rain chances getting as high as 90%.

We normally think of ambulances in the "emergency" sense: responding to crash scenes, medical emergencies, and in the "stand-by" mode at festivals, sporting events, and other large gatherings, but forget about their "shuttle" service.

When natural disasters happen, ambulance services are called upon to transport patients in the event of evacuations, whether they be an emergency evac or a precautionary evac.

In the case of rising water (as we've had this week), Acadian Ambulance has access to high-water vehicles that are able to traverse deeper water than their regular ambulances, so they have those on the ready as well.

If the water begins to creep up on nursing homes or other single-floor medical facilities, ambulance services are called upon to transport those patients/residents to a safe location. The closer the ambulances, and the more plentiful, the quicker everyone can be moved to safety, safely.

Hopefully, we won't need their services, but it's good to know that they are ready!

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

Six Pictures From Acadiana You Can Smell With Your Eyes

10 Ways to be a Better Neighbor