The wife of an Illinois lineman who is currently in Louisiana to help restore power says her husband has never eaten better in his life.

UPDATE: As it would turn out, Valerie doesn't actually have a husband who is a lineman, but the story is still too good to not share. Plus, she's helping to do amazing work.

Keep up with her fundraising efforts and keep sharing those Cajun cooking tips at the links provided at the end of the original story!

Valerie Diedrich is learning the true meaning of southern hospitality as Louisianians from every corner of the state are helping her to make a grocery list that will satisfy her hubby when he returns home.

You see, Val's husband is one of many linemen who are here from out of state—and while resources aren't necessarily able to cover for all of the service workers, the locals have stepped up in a major way.

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Valerie is doing her best to take notes based on what she can gather from social media, and her "shopping list" has gone viral on social media, as everyone is chiming in with recipes and tips for her to provide the best Cajun cooking for her man when he returns home.

As you can see, they've been eating really well.

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Val has organized fundraising to cover for all the people who are providing meals and services for her husband and the other out-of-state linemen are hustling to get the job done.

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News of her shopping list and her fundraising efforts caught the eye of a few different social media accounts, including Fleurty Girl, a popular brand out of New Orleans.

Val's list (on its third revision) has descriptions of all of the supplies and grocery items needed for her to keep her husband fed with the cuisine that he's been enjoying over the past week in south Louisiana.

From Magnalite pots to "Cajun cauldrons" and every gumbo ingredient you could imagine, Diedrich's list is very detailed and the more it goes viral, the more people are adding their own special recipes and personal tips to the list.

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There were so many tips coming in that Val just created her own Facebook group that you can find here.

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There is also an ongoing fundraiser that details how the donations are being used to feed and help the out-of-state lineman. You can view and donate to that cause here.

Lord knows we are more than appreciative of the extra help when it comes to getting basic utilities restored for Louisiana residents, so to see this happening in real-time is nothing short of amazing.

I think Diane summed it up nicely, wouldn't you agree?

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Share this with anyone who can lend a helping hand, or a recipe. Let's keep it going—and hopefully, Val will continue to give us update when her husband is back at home.

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