I would imagine that you remember the hullabaloo around the removal of the Alfred Mouton statue in Lafayette, as there was ample discussion about the matter.

After the statue was removed, the base remained. This week, workers used heavy machinery to break up and remove the pedestal upon which the statue was erected.

A Reddit user, BroManDudeGuyPhD, posted a video of the removal and, as usual, a conversation started in the comments section.

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Most of the comments seemed to echo the "good riddance" stance that many took in reference to the statue. Why "good riddance"? Because many people feel that we should not honor anyone who fought to keep humans in chains.

The video was taken from across the street at Carpe Diem as the person filming was sipping coffee, according to the OP.

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Ah, it's great to see father and son getting along, especially when it is on the side of anti-racism!

Some, though, are still upset that the Alfred Mouton statue was removed, one person "guessing" that Mouton had said something that offended someone hundreds of years ago.

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Reddit user Gooshuh made the comment about Mouton offending someone and was quickly put in his place with an instant history lesson.

Really? As late as 2017, statues of people who fought to keep slavery are still being erected? When will we (they) learn?

Maybe never, as people were actually placing bouquets of flowers at the base of the Mouton statue after it was removed, according to one user on Reddit.

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lavventura___1980 frequents the area Downtown where the Mouton statue once stood and claims that it really was happening.

Again, the majority of the comments echoed escargeaux's stance on the subject:

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Through this whole mess, I do feel for the Mouton family, though. Any descendants of Alfred Mouton must be torn in regards to the removal of the statue and their family's legacy, in general.

I would expect people to have pride in their family, as I do, but I am certain most people can find ancestors who weren't necessarily a pillar of society in their family (myself included).

The good thing about the people in my family whose actions would be frowned upon today is that they are now long gone. I think that it is the duty of each of us, going forward, to behave in a manner that wouldn't get our statue removed 200 years from now.

Or ever, for that matter.

And for the record: I am not against the erection of statues that commemorate Confederate soldiers on private property. I just think that they should be kept off of public or government property (save for museums and historic sites/battlefields).

One bit of humor that was found within the thread was the thought that, had the pedestal not been removed, it would have served as a good base for someone in Acadiana who we should be honoring. He's not native to this area, but he certainly is an Honorary Cajun: Rob Perillo!

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via Reddit
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