In the South, old plantations are commonly used as sites for wedding nuptials.

Most people don't stop to think about the history of the facility but rather appreciate it for the beauty it holds. But a couple of popular wedding-planning sites seem to want to remind us all about the former and not the latter.

Pinterest and The Knot have announced they are no longer promoting content for "plantation-style" weddings.

A statement from Pinterest to ABC News reads:

Weddings should be a symbol of love and unity. Plantations represent none of those things. We are grateful to Color of Change for bringing attention to this disrespectful practice.

(Color of Change is a California-based racial justice advocacy organization.)

The company also said it's "working to limit the distribution of this content and accounts across our platform, and continue to not accept advertisements for them."

Several celebrities have tied the knot at "plantation" venues. However, this wedding trend has been widely slammed for romanticizing the history of slavery in the United States.

"The wedding industry, in the past couple of decades, has made millions of dollars in profit by promoting plantations as romantic places to marry," Jade Magnus Ogunnaike, interim senior campaign director at Color of Change said. "Unfortunately, this denies the actual reality."

She went on to say that "plantations were spaces where black people were harmed, raped, beaten and forced to work. They're not romantic places to get married."

The Knot Worldwide told ABC News that it's also working with Color of Change to update its guidelines.

Color of Change brought an issue to light about the way venues with a history of slavery describe their properties to couples. We're currently working with Color of Change to create additions to our current content guidelines that will ensure all couples feel welcomed and respected on our sites.

Ogunnaike said their focus is on keeping the advertising honest, but the ideal outcome would be that no one marries on plantations.