A crazy hit-and-run in New Orleans ended with a vehicle being set on fire and the whole thing was caught on camera.

According to WWL-TV, the incident took place in the 2500 block of Dumaine Street in New Orleans' Tremé neighborhood. A white truck is seen crashing into the back of a black SUV that was parked on the street. After slamming into the back of the vehicle, the driver of the white truck is seen fleeing on foot.

Video surveillance from a nearby Ring camera caught the entire bizarre scene on tape.

Hours later, the alleged driver of the white truck returns to the scene of the crash and sets the truck on fire before running away for a second time. The New Orleans Fire Department confirms they were able to put out the fire without any injuries reported.

A local resident who lives in the area said they were upset that it took police so long to respond to the incident after three hours passed before any officers arrived on the scene.

Three hours, three and half hours. I am pretty confident had they come when the original hit and run happened it wouldn’t have caught on fire. It was terrifying because we were afraid after the fire had been put out that they were going to come back.

The reason for the delay was reportedly due to the fact that the call "was never elevated from a hit-and-run to an arson call."

The incident is currently under investigation and police and fire officials are working in a joint effort to solve the case.

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Stacker used data from the 2020 County Health Rankings to rank every state's average life expectancy from lowest to highest. The 2020 County Health Rankings values were calculated using mortality counts from the 2016-2018 National Center for Health Statistics. The U.S. Census 2019 American Community Survey and America's Health Rankings Senior Report 2019 data were also used to provide demographics on the senior population of each state and the state's rank on senior health care, respectively.

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